Wednesday, 29 October 2008

Daring Bakers Challenge - Pizza

This was my first challenge with The Daring Bakers. I was not and am still not sure if I'm up to the task but I thought it would be fun to have a go and stretch my baking horizons a bit. The challenge was titled "Bake Your Pizzas Like A Real Pizzaiolo" and was set by Rosa
I have made pizzas before so it wasn't a complete mystery to me. The tossing of the pizza dough was. My husband thought I'd lost it completely at this point. I did have a go but my photographer isn't happy with a camera and as the dough ended up full of holes and landed on the floor, much to the interest of our wee dog, I decided to exclude those particular pictures. It was great fun trying though but it's back to the rolling pin for me. It was a lovely pizza. The recipe made a lot of dough and I wouldn't make as much the next time as there are only two of us to cater for. I liked the idea of keeping the dough in the fridge for a few days. It was handy to make it in instalments.
We were allowed to make our own topping. There is far too much cheese on my pizza but I love lots of the stuff. The recipe was taken from "The Bread Bakers Apprentice" by Peter Rheinhart

I made my topping by draining and squishing two tins of tomatoes in a colander. I infused this with garlic black pepper and torn basil leaves. When the dough was ready I spread this over the top added black and green olives and some peppadew peppers for a little heat. I then added grated cheddar, parmesan and mozzarella cheese.

Recipe for the Dough

4 1/2 cups /20.25 ounces/607.5gms unbleached high-gluten, bread, or all-purpose flour, chilled
1 3/4 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon instant yeast
1/4 cup/ 2 ounces /60 gms olive oil (optional)
1 3/4 cups /14 ounces/420mls water, ice cold (40°F)
Semolina flour or cornmeal for dusting

1. Stir together the flour, salt, and instant yeast in a large bowl (or in the bowl of an electric mixer). With a large metal spoon, stir in the oil and the cold water until the flour is all absorbed (or mix on low speed with the paddle attachment), If you are mixing by hand, repeatedly dip one of your hands or the metal spoon into cold water and use it, much like a dough hook, to work the dough vigorously into a smooth mass while rotating the bowl in a circular motion with the other hand. Reverse the circular motion a few times to develop the gluten further. Do this for 5 to 7 minutes, or until the dough is smooth and the ingredients are evenly distributed. If you are using an electric mixer, switch to the dough hook and mix on medium speed for 5 to 7 minutes, or as long as it takes to create a smooth, sticky dough. The dough should clear the sides of the bowl but stick to the bottom of the bowl. If the dough is too wet and doesn't come off the sides of the bowl, sprinkle in some more flour just until it clears the sides. If it clears the bottom of the bowl, dribble in a tea- spoon or two of cold water. The finished dough will be springy, elastic, and sticky, not just tacky, and register 50 to 55F.

2. Sprinkle flour on the counter and transfer the dough to the counter. Prepare a sheet pan by lining it with baking parchment and misting the parchment with spray oil (or lightly oil the parchment). Using a metal dough scraper, cut the dough into 6 equal pieces (or larger if you are comfortable shaping large pizzas), You can dip the scraper into the water between cuts to keep the dough from sticking to it, Sprinkle flour over the dough. Make sure your hands are dry and then flour them. Lift each piece and gently round it into a ball. If the dough sticks to your hands, dip your hands into the flour again. Transfer the dough balls to the sheet pan, Mist the dough generously with spray oil and slip the pan into a food-grade plastic bag.

3. Put the pan into the refrigerator overnight to rest the dough, or keep for up to 3 days. (Note: If you want to save some of the dough for future baking, you can store the dough balls in a zippered freezer bag. Dip each dough ball into a bowl that has a few tablespoons of oil in it, rolling the dough in the oil, and then put each ball into a separate bag. You can place the bags into the freezer for up to 3 months. Transfer them to the refrigerator the day before you plan to make pizza.)

4. On the day you plan to make the pizza, remove the desired number of dough balls from the refrigerator 2 hours before making the pizza. Dust the counter with flour, and then mist the counter with spray oil. Place the dough balls on top of the floured counter and sprinkle them with flour; dust your hands with flour. Gently press the dough into flat disks about 1/2 inch thick and 5 inches in diameter. Sprinkle the dough with flour, mist it again with spray oil, and cover the dough loosely with plastic wrap or a food-grade plastic bag. Let rest for 2 hours.

5. At least 45 minutes before making the pizza, place a baking stone either on the floor of the oven (for gas ovens), or on a rack in the lower third of the oven. Preheat the oven as hot as possible, up to 800F (most home ovens will go only to 500 to 550F, but some will go higher). If you do not have a baking stone, you can use the back of a sheet pan, but do not preheat the pan.

6. Generously dust a peel or the back of a sheet pan with semolina flour or cornmeal. Make the pizzas one at a time. Dip your hands, including the backs of your hands and knuckles, in flour and lift I piece of dough by getting under it with a pastry scraper. Very gently lay the dough across your fists and carefully stretch it by bouncing the dough in a circular motion on your hands, carefully giving it a little stretch with each bounce. If it begins to stick to your hands, lay it down on the floured counter and reflour your hands, then continue shaping it. Once the dough has expanded outward, move to a full toss as shown on page 208. If you have trouble tossing the dough, or if the dough keeps springing back, let it rest for 5 to 20 minutes so the gluten can relax, and try again. You can also resort to using a rolling pin, though this isn't as effective as the toss method.

7. When the dough is stretched out to your satisfaction (about 9 to 12 inches in diameter for a 6-ounce piece of dough), lay it on the peel or pan, making sure there is enough semolina flour or cornmeal to allow it to slide. Lightly top it with sauce and then with your other top- pings, remembering that the best pizzas are topped with a less-is-more philosophy. The American "kitchen sink" approach is counterproductive, as it makes the crust more difficult to bake. A few, usually no more than 3 or 4 toppings, including sauce and cheese is sufficient.

8. Slide the topped pizza onto the stone (or bake directly on the sheet pan) and close the door. Wait 2 minutes, then take a peek. If it needs to be rotated 180 degrees for even baking, do so. The pizza should take about 5 to 8 minutes to bake. If the top gets done before the bottom, you will need to move the stone to a lower self before the next round. if the bottom crisps before the cheese caramelizes, then you will need to raise the stone for subsequent bakes.

9. Remove the pizza from the oven and transfer to a cutting board. Wait 3 to 5 minutes before slicing and serving, to allow the cheese to set slightly.

Makes six 6-ounce pizza crusts.

22 comments:

Rosa's Yummy Yums said...

Your pizza looks really good! A scrumptious treat! Great job!

Cheers,

Rosa

Dana McCauley said...

That is one cheesy pizza - looks great!

culinarytravelsofakitchengoddess said...

Absolutely fabulous Brenda and welcome to the DB's

Y said...

Welcome to the Daring Bakers! Your pizzas look great.

Jo said...

Good job on your pizza challenge. Looks delish!

Coby said...

LOL Brenda, you know my lovely man will tell you there is no such thing as 'too much' cheese on a pizza;) Your pizza just looks cheesily delicious - well done tossing too;)

Victoria Sponge said...

Wow your pizza looks good. I think I know what I'm going to make for dinner now!!!! Vicky xxx

RecipeGirl said...

Terrific first challenge! Just do them as you feel you're able. There are a few that have completely overwhelmed me and I've had to sit out. Welcome to the DB!

Oh my! Apple pie! said...

Brenda welcome to the Daring bakers, it's great fun isnt it.
You did a great job.

Passionate About Baking said...

What a great first challenge...am sure the dog felt lucky indeed! Well done & welcome to DB's!!! Cheers Deeba

Rosie said...

Welcome Granny to the Daring Bakers you are going to have so much fun!

What a marvellous job you've done with your scrummy pizza!

Rosie x

Elra said...

Congratulation on your first challenge. You're doing great. Your pizza looks delicious.

Big Boys Oven said...

wow that [pizzalook so beautiful, wanting me to eat the screen1 :( but you did so well! ;) congrats!

Laura @ Hungry and Frozen said...

I like too much cheese on my pizza too :) looks delicious, although you'd hope it would be after a recipe that lengthy!

Rhyleysgranny said...

There were some stunning pizzas out there. I think mine was fairly mediocre in comparison. I am so grateful for all your encouraging comments. Thank you
xxx

Hannah Magowan said...

Brenda that pizza looks amazing! Do you do deliveries?

Hxx

Rhyleysgranny said...

Hannah my lovely niece. How nice to see you drop in:):):) Delivery can be arranged LOL
xxxxxxxxxx

Julie said...

Your pizza turned out beautifully! Wasn't this a fun challenge? I will definitely be making this crust again (I still need to get that photo of me tossing the dough....)

Lynn said...

I think you passed your first challenge with flying colors. You have absolutely nothing to worry about. Your pizza looks fabulous. I actually enjoyed scrolling through your blog. Well done.

Eat4Fun said...

Very nice looking pizza. Congratulations on completing your first DB Challenge!

Gloria said...

Brenda, Brenda, your pizza feel me soooo hungry!!!and I breakfast onlyright now!!Looks yummy and lovely!! xxxGloria

Lisa Michelle said...

Great job on your first challenge :) Your pizzas look amazing!